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If you’ve ever tried to soothe a crying baby or console a loved one, you know that one of the most helpful things you can do is to make physical contact and rock with them back and forth. This simple act has an incredibly powerful and calming effect on both the body and mind. It’s a comforting and reassuring gesture that’s practically embedded in our DNA. When you consider the fact that the average adult male is about 60% water, the adult female, 55% water, and a one year old infant is close to 75% water, it’s no wonder our bodies have adapted to this movement. Much like the tide, the inherent rhythms of our bodies have an ebb and flow.

The therapeutic benefits of rocking can be clearly seen in what Thai yogis refer to as the rhythmic, rocking dance. In Thai yoga massage, the practitioner moves their body in rhythmic and swaying fashion to help create an even distribution of pressure during the massage. And herein lies the key to getting a great massage that’s both therapeutic and extremely relaxing.

The principles behind rocking are rooted in Thai Chi. A Thai Chi master uses very little of his or her own energy to create their movement. Their bodies are never rigid or stiff but instead fluid and graceful. This is because their center of gravity is rooted in what Eastern body workers refer to as the Hara, which in Japanese loosely translates to “soft belly.” The area three finger widths below the naval is anatomically referred to as the solar plexus. It’s the location of the your 2nd chakra or sacral chakra. It’s also referred to as the Tanden or Dantien.           

When movement is initiated from this area, the practitioner is using their body weight instead of the force of their muscles to deliver the pressure. As a result, energy can move freely up and down the spine, through the practitioner’s limbs, and out their hands. When pressure is applied in this way, it feels great. The pressure is even and deep, never jerky or awkward. If the body is stiff and the practitioner is using their own strength to deliver pressure, the kink in the flow of energy will quickly tire them out and eventually affect the recipient. In other words, it’s not going to feel good.

There are three basic forms of rocking employed in Thai massage, the bamboo rock, the forward rock, and the whirlpool rock. The bamboo rock or side rock is used frequently during meridian work in Thai massage. The movement is a fluid side-to-side motion much like a bamboo reed being blown in the wind. The bamboo rock is a great way to gently stimulate the energy meridians throughout the body without causing pain in stagnant areas. The forward rock is often used during certain stretches and tractioning movements as an effective way of opening up the body. A traditional stretch can be painful if done too aggressively. The forward rock allows the body to relax during the entire stretch. The whirlpool rock can be looked at as combination of both the bamboo and forward rock. The circular motion of the whirlpool rock has a very meditative quality which can be employed anywhere from Hara work to range of motion movements of the limbs.

So far all the rocking techniques discussed have been movements the Thai yogi employs in administering a natural and even distribution of pressure. Another form of rocking, which is commonly used in Shiatsu but can be translated into Thai or even table massage is called kembiki. In this form of rocking, the recipient is lying in a prone position while the therapist is applies an oscillating motion to the torso and limbs. In kembiki the recipient’s body is in constant motion. Doing this creates an almost trance like quality which is deeply meditative and very relaxing.

Regardless of the form it takes, rocking is an effective tool in reducing tension and stress in the body. Unfortunately, it tends to be under employed in traditional massage. For those people that find a static table massage uncomfortable or painful for whatever reason, a little bit of rocking can be a transform a regular massage into a truly amazing experience.


joe-azevedo2Joe Azevedo is a New York State/NCBTMB Licensed Massage Therapist, ARCB Certified Reflexologist, Certified Thai Yogi, and an Advanced Reiki Practitioner. He is a graduate of the Swedish Institute and is the owner and founder of Brooklyn Reflexology.

Thai yoga massage has been around for millennia. This very ancient form of bodywork uses elements of compression, rocking, stretching, and various yoga poses to create a therapeutic response. But there are a few key distinctions which set it apart from a traditional Swedish or deep tissue massage. If you’re new to massage or if you’re trying to decide which is best for you, knowing what to expect may make that decision a little easier to make. Let’s take a look at some of the main differences between a Thai massage and a table massage.

  1. No table: One of the main differences between Thai massage and a table massage is that Thai massage is done on a mat on the floor. A traditional Swedish/deep tissue massage is done on a massage table.
  2. No need to undress: Thai massage is done fully clothed wearing loose, comfortable clothing. A full body table massage is usually done with the client partially or fully undressed, underneath a sheet and cover.
  3. No lotions or oils: A Thai massage does not use any crèmes, lotions, oils, or gels. Whereas a table massage can use any of the latter in its application.
  4. Techniques: A Thai massage will often use elements or compression, rocking, stretching, breath work and range of motion to create its therapeutic effect. A table massage may also use elements such as these but mainly focuses on techniques such as kneading, stroking, effleurage/petrissage, and friction for breaking up of adhesions and knots.
  5. Energetic component: A Thai massage incorporates energy line work through the use of palming and thumbing of the Sen lines in the body. A traditional Swedish/deep tissue massage does not work these energy lines specifically.
  6. Stretching: As mentioned already, Thai massage uses a great deal of stretching to address areas of tension and to relieve energy blockages. A table massage may also incorporate stretching but not to the extent that a Thai massage does.
  7. Positions used: In traditional table massage, most will lie face down (prone position) or face up (supine position) for a majority of their session. On occasion a side-lying position is used for targeted work. In Thai massage however, in addition to both the prone and supine positions, the side-lying, semi-prone, and seated positions are used as well.

Given these differences, one form of massage may be better suited for you than the other. Although both have their therapeutic qualities, personal preferences and expectations may have a significant impact on how the work is received. Also, each practitioner may have his or her own unique style, which will influence the work as well. No matter which form of massage you choose, make sure to seek out a knowledgeable, well-trained, and licensed professional to ensure you’re getting the best possible work available.


joe-azevedo2Joe Azevedo is a New York State/NCBTMB Licensed Massage Therapist, ARCB Certified Reflexologist, Certified Thai Yogi, and an Advanced Reiki Practitioner. He is a graduate of the Swedish Institute and is the owner and founder of Brooklyn Reflexology.

Thai Yoga Massage (TYM) is an ancient form of bodywork that combines elements of yoga, Tai chi, and massage. Its origins are rooted in Ayurvedic medicine and date back 2500 years to India and the Buddhist temples of Thailand. Often referred to as “Assisted Hatha Yoga,” the practice is performed on a mat on the floor with the client wearing loose comfortable clothing to facilitate ease of movement. Practitioners guide the client through various yoga poses and stretches while palming and thumbing the energy lines of the body, known as Sen lines. The slow, rhythmic movements used in TYM create a flow that gently balances the body’s energy lines, while increasing range of motion, improving circulation, and relieving chronic muscular tension.

The founder of Thai Yoga Massage was an Indian, Ayurvedic doctor by the name of Jivaka Kumar Bhaccha. His renown for treating kings and noblemen led him to become the Buddha’s personal physician. The Buddha’s teachings eventually became a huge influence on Jivaka and his work. When Buddhism spread to Thailand, the practice of yoga and Ayurvedic medicine also followed. TYM, also known as Nuad Boran in Thailand, took shape in the Buddhist temples of Thailand and was passed down from master to apprentice through oral tradition. Because Buddhist philosophy is so enmeshed in the practice of TYM, practitioners view it as the physical application of “metta,” which translates into – loving-kindness.

Thai Yoga Massage has since evolved into two main styles, the northern and the southern. The Old Medical Hospital in Chang Mai, Thailand has become the main hub for the northern style and Wat Pho in Bangkok, the center for the southern style. Although the two share a lot in common, they differ in how the energy lines are worked. The northern style involves palming and thumbing of the Sen lines and is generally a bit more active with its stretches and yoga poses. The southern style is more relaxed in its approach and uses a technique known as plucking to stimulate the energy lines via the nerves. These days, more and more practitioners are combining elements of both styles making it harder to distinguish between the two. In addition to these techniques, practitioners of both styles will often use their forearms, elbows, knees and feet to work the body.

There are a few other key distinctions worth noting between the different styles of Thai massage, namely the pacing and amount of pressure used. These elements do have a stylistic component to them but more often than not are influenced by the individual practitioner. Some may choose to use a quick and vigorous pace to work the energy lines of the body, while others will work in a slower, more deliberate manner. The other element is how much pressure is used during a session. Originally, Thai massage was widely administered as a form of medicine for various types of malaise throughout Thailand, so relaxation was not considered its main objective. In the hands of a few master practitioners however, the application of pressure could vary greatly from a light to deep touch depending on the client and the area being worked on. Working in this fashion takes into account both our physical and energetic bodies and becomes meditative in nature.

Traditional TYM focuses a good amount of time on the legs and lower body. The reason for this has to do with how much time Thai people spend on their feet. A majority of them spend their day working on their feet. By contrast, most westerners spend most of their day sitting in a chair in front of a computer. They also tend to be taller and heavier and have more upper body issues. At Brooklyn Reflexology a form of northern Thai massage, which addresses both the lower and upper body is used. An emphasis is placed on flow and fluidity of movement to help create a deeply therapeutic affect on the body, mind and spirit.


joe-azevedo2Joe Azevedo is a New York State/NCBTMB Licensed Massage Therapist, ARCB Certified Reflexologist, and an Advanced Reiki Practitioner. He is a graduate of the Swedish Institute and is the owner and founder of Brooklyn Reflexology.

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