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In some cases, the affects of heel pain may have a different source. As previously mentioned, tight calf muscles can often predispose you to developing plantar fasciitis. A byproduct of this are trigger points. Trigger points are tiny contractions in the muscle fiber which form as a result of over-use, strain, trauma, or shortened and tight muscles. Trigger points refer pain to other areas of the body. In the case of the lower leg, there are several muscles which could be referring pain to the heel and long arch of the foot – the same area where plantar fasciitis pain occurs. Let’s take a look at the first image below.

Soleus TP

This image depicts a trigger point in the middle of the soleus muscle. The soleus is a large calf muscle that plays a major role in plantar flexing your foot. The muscle is accessible half way down your lower leg and attaches itself to the foot via the Achilles tendon. If the muscle is tight, it will keep your foot plantar flexed (toes pointing down) and limit the amount of dorsiflexion (toes pointing up) available. This limitation will invariably put a strain on the muscles and fascia of the foot.

Quadratus Plantae TP

This second image shows a trigger point in the quadratus plantae muscle — a deep intrinsic foot muscle. Pain from a trigger point in this muscle can be a sharp, stabbing pain preventing you from putting your full weight down on your heel.

Gastrocnemius TP

And lastly, another common site of plantar fasciitis pain is along the medial arch of the foot. A trigger point in the medial head of the gastrconemius muscle can often refer pain to this area. Your gastrocnemius muscles are the superficial muscles found on the upper part of the lower leg. These muscles are very strong, powerful muscles which also attach to the foot via the Achilles tendon. They are often recruited in activities such as sprinting and jumping due to their capacity to lift your entire body weight.

It’s important to remember that while true plantar fascitiis takes time to heal, the effects of trigger points in these muscles could perpetuate pain in the area long after the condition has resolved itself. Along with treating the symptoms of referred pain, trigger point therapy has the added benefit of addressing tight calf muscles, which could be contributing to the condition. So whether you’ve been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis or are dealing with foot pain of some kind, in addition to your conventional treatments, trigger point therapy in combination with reflexology should be a part of your recovery plan.


joe-azevedo2Joe Azevedo is a New York State/NCBTMB Licensed Massage Therapist, ARCB Certified Reflexologist, and an Advanced Reiki Practitioner. He is a graduate of the Swedish Institute and is the owner and founder of Brooklyn Reflexology.

We rely on our feet to take us just about everywhere. So if heel pain is causing you to curtail your daily activities, this can be a huge problem. In the first half of this article, we’ll look at the most common form of heel pain — plantar fasciitis.  In the second half, we’ll consider how the effects of trigger points in the lower leg muscles can be a contributing factor and/or the cause of your heel pain!

Plantar fasciitis is a fairly common condition that causes pain and inflammation in the fascia which cover the bottoms of your feet. These tough bands of connective tissue run from your heel bone to your metatarsals and provide a good amount of arch support. Micro-ruptures can form due to repeated pulling, stress, and/or trauma to the area. If not treated properly, the condition can become chronic and lead to the formation of a heel spur, which can then cause further irritation and pain.

Plantar fasciitis typically affects those who have relatively: high arches (pes cavus), flat feet (pes planus), tight calf muscles, or tight, ill-fitting shoes. It can also occur in people who spend most of their day on their feet, those who are overweight, and runners who suddenly increase their activity level. Excessive pronation of the foot, running on sand or uneven surfaces, and inadequate arch support from worn out shoes can also be contributing factors.

The major signs and symptoms include:

– Pain at the heel when weight bearing

– Morning stiffness and pain that decreases with activity

– Tenderness along the medial arch when pressure is applied

– Pain when standing on your toes and /or walking on your heels

– Numbness along the outside of the foot

– Occasional swelling over the heel

– X-rays that reveal bone spurs where the fascia attaches on the heel bone

If you’ve been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis, chances are that most conservative methods should help alleviate the condition in a majority of cases. Such remedies may include:

– Rest, along with an over the counter NSAID to help with pain and inflammation

– Ice and myofascial massage to the affected area

– Orthotics and/or new shoes with good arch support

– Stretches for lower leg and foot muscles

– Night splints

In severe cases when the condition is particularly chronic and debilitating, your doctor may prescribe cortisone shots. While the shots may help to manage the condition, they are not a cure. It is crucial to be proactive and stave off any possible long-term effects by doing your homework. This will help speed up the recovery time significantly.


joe-azevedo2Joe Azevedo is a New York State/NCBTMB Licensed Massage Therapist,  ARCB Certified Reflexologist, and an Advanced Reiki Practitioner. He is a graduate of the Swedish Institute and is the owner and founder of Brooklyn Reflexology.

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