Thai yoga massage has been around for millennia. This very ancient form of bodywork uses elements of compression, rocking, stretching, and various yoga poses to create a therapeutic response. But there are a few key distinctions which set it apart from a traditional Swedish or deep tissue massage. If you’re new to massage or if you’re trying to decide which is best for you, knowing what to expect may make that decision a little easier to make. Let’s take a look at some of the main differences between a Thai massage and a table massage.

  1. No table: One of the main differences between Thai massage and a table massage is that Thai massage is done on a mat on the floor. A traditional Swedish/deep tissue massage is done on a massage table.
  2. No need to undress: Thai massage is done fully clothed wearing loose, comfortable clothing. A full body table massage is usually done with the client partially or fully undressed, underneath a sheet and cover.
  3. No lotions or oils: A Thai massage does not use any crèmes, lotions, oils, or gels. Whereas a table massage can use any of the latter in its application.
  4. Techniques: A Thai massage will often use elements or compression, rocking, stretching, breath work and range of motion to create its therapeutic effect. A table massage may also use elements such as these but mainly focuses on techniques such as kneading, stroking, effleurage/petrissage, and friction for breaking up of adhesions and knots.
  5. Energetic component: A Thai massage incorporates energy line work through the use of palming and thumbing of the Sen lines in the body. A traditional Swedish/deep tissue massage does not work these energy lines specifically.
  6. Stretching: As mentioned already, Thai massage uses a great deal of stretching to address areas of tension and to relieve energy blockages. A table massage may also incorporate stretching but not to the extent that a Thai massage does.
  7. Positions used: In traditional table massage, most will lie face down (prone position) or face up (supine position) for a majority of their session. On occasion a side-lying position is used for targeted work. In Thai massage however, in addition to both the prone and supine positions, the side-lying, semi-prone, and seated positions are used as well.

Given these differences, one form of massage may be better suited for you than the other. Although both have their therapeutic qualities, personal preferences and expectations may have a significant impact on how the work is received. Also, each practitioner may have his or her own unique style, which will influence the work as well. No matter which form of massage you choose, make sure to seek out a knowledgeable, well-trained, and licensed professional to ensure you’re getting the best possible work available.


joe-azevedo2Joe Azevedo is a New York State/NCBTMB Licensed Massage Therapist, ARCB Certified Reflexologist, Certified Thai Yogi, and an Advanced Reiki Practitioner. He is a graduate of the Swedish Institute and is the owner and founder of Brooklyn Reflexology.