In some cases, the affects of heel pain may have a different source. As previously mentioned, tight calf muscles can often predispose you to developing plantar fasciitis. A byproduct of this are trigger points. Trigger points are tiny contractions in the muscle fiber which form as a result of over-use, strain, trauma, or shortened and tight muscles. Trigger points refer pain to other areas of the body. In the case of the lower leg, there are several muscles which could be referring pain to the heel and long arch of the foot – the same area where plantar fasciitis pain occurs. Let’s take a look at the first image below.

Soleus TP

This image depicts a trigger point in the middle of the soleus muscle. The soleus is a large calf muscle that plays a major role in plantar flexing your foot. The muscle is accessible half way down your lower leg and attaches itself to the foot via the Achilles tendon. If the muscle is tight, it will keep your foot plantar flexed (toes pointing down) and limit the amount of dorsiflexion (toes pointing up) available. This limitation will invariably put a strain on the muscles and fascia of the foot.

Quadratus Plantae TP

This second image shows a trigger point in the quadratus plantae muscle — a deep intrinsic foot muscle. Pain from a trigger point in this muscle can be a sharp, stabbing pain preventing you from putting your full weight down on your heel.

Gastrocnemius TP

And lastly, another common site of plantar fasciitis pain is along the medial arch of the foot. A trigger point in the medial head of the gastrconemius muscle can often refer pain to this area. Your gastrocnemius muscles are the superficial muscles found on the upper part of the lower leg. These muscles are very strong, powerful muscles which also attach to the foot via the Achilles tendon. They are often recruited in activities such as sprinting and jumping due to their capacity to lift your entire body weight.

It’s important to remember that while true plantar fascitiis takes time to heal, the effects of trigger points in these muscles could perpetuate pain in the area long after the condition has resolved itself. Along with treating the symptoms of referred pain, trigger point therapy has the added benefit of addressing tight calf muscles, which could be contributing to the condition. So whether you’ve been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis or are dealing with foot pain of some kind, in addition to your conventional treatments, trigger point therapy in combination with reflexology should be a part of your recovery plan.


joe-azevedo2Joe Azevedo is a New York State/NCBTMB Licensed Massage Therapist, ARCB Certified Reflexologist, and an Advanced Reiki Practitioner. He is a graduate of the Swedish Institute and is the owner and founder of Brooklyn Reflexology.