We rely on our feet to take us just about everywhere. So if heel pain is causing you to curtail your daily activities, this can be a huge problem. In the first half of this article, we’ll look at the most common form of heel pain — plantar fasciitis.  In the second half, we’ll consider how the effects of trigger points in the lower leg muscles can be a contributing factor and/or the cause of your heel pain!

Plantar fasciitis is a fairly common condition that causes pain and inflammation in the fascia which cover the bottoms of your feet. These tough bands of connective tissue run from your heel bone to your metatarsals and provide a good amount of arch support. Micro-ruptures can form due to repeated pulling, stress, and/or trauma to the area. If not treated properly, the condition can become chronic and lead to the formation of a heel spur, which can then cause further irritation and pain.

Plantar fasciitis typically affects those who have relatively: high arches (pes cavus), flat feet (pes planus), tight calf muscles, or tight, ill-fitting shoes. It can also occur in people who spend most of their day on their feet, those who are overweight, and runners who suddenly increase their activity level. Excessive pronation of the foot, running on sand or uneven surfaces, and inadequate arch support from worn out shoes can also be contributing factors.

The major signs and symptoms include:

– Pain at the heel when weight bearing

– Morning stiffness and pain that decreases with activity

– Tenderness along the medial arch when pressure is applied

– Pain when standing on your toes and /or walking on your heels

– Numbness along the outside of the foot

– Occasional swelling over the heel

– X-rays that reveal bone spurs where the fascia attaches on the heel bone

If you’ve been diagnosed with plantar fasciitis, chances are that most conservative methods should help alleviate the condition in a majority of cases. Such remedies may include:

– Rest, along with an over the counter NSAID to help with pain and inflammation

– Ice and myofascial massage to the affected area

– Orthotics and/or new shoes with good arch support

– Stretches for lower leg and foot muscles

– Night splints

In severe cases when the condition is particularly chronic and debilitating, your doctor may prescribe cortisone shots. While the shots may help to manage the condition, they are not a cure. It is crucial to be proactive and stave off any possible long-term effects by doing your homework. This will help speed up the recovery time significantly.


joe-azevedo2Joe Azevedo is a New York State/NCBTMB Licensed Massage Therapist,  ARCB Certified Reflexologist, and an Advanced Reiki Practitioner. He is a graduate of the Swedish Institute and is the owner and founder of Brooklyn Reflexology.